RedPrairie Expands SaaS Infrastructure

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RedPrairie, which offers online applications to help retailers manage their supply chains, is expanding its data center network, the company said Wednesday. RedPrairie will lease space in new Savvis data centers in Atlanta and Sterling, Va. to support the growth of its software-as-a-service (SaaS) offerings, which host more than 6,000 sites serving the retail, hospitality and petroleum industries. RedPrairie currently hosts customers from data centers in Atlanta and London.

“Our customers are seeing great value in the software-as-a-service delivery model,” said Stewart Chisam, Senior Vice President of Technology for RedPrairie’s Retail Productivity Solutions. “Savvis advanced hosting and infrastructure services model, featuring on-demand utility services such as virtualized storage, archiving and back up capabilities, allows us to flexibly respond to increases in demand, and gives us a worldwide footprint for expansion.”


RedPrairie’s hosted offerings are available with modular subscription pricing, so customers only pay for the parts of the applications necessary for their operations. Services offered with hosting include disaster recovery, maintenance, and IT administration and integration services. Companies can also migrate from a hosted or SaaS agreement to a traditional license.

SaaS is one of many trends contributing to demand for data center services. Savvis is among the managed hosting providers offering customized solutions for SaaS providers.

Savvis now operates 24 data centers in the U.S., Europe, and Asia encompassing approximately 1.1 million square feet. The company’s expansion, which also includes new centers in Piscataway, N.J. and Santa Clara, Calif., was funded in part by Savvis’ sale of its CDN business to Level 3.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.