Savvis Opens New Atlanta Data Center

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Savvis, Inc. (SVVS) has opened its new data center in Atlanta, part of a broader expansion to add more than 180,000 square feet of data center space in four cities. The new Atlanta facility is housed in the Digital Realty Trust (DLR) building in Lithia Springs, a western suburb of Atlanta, and offers approximately 30,000 square feet of raised floor space. The new center has 25 employees and provides customers with up to 165 watts per square foot of power.

“Atlanta is a key business hub in the U.S.,” said James Whitemore, Chief Marketing Officer for Savvis. “Our new Atlanta data center was built specifically to provide IT infrastructure as service to the growing number of Fortune 1000 firms with operations in Atlanta. In addition, Atlanta’s location outside of the hurricane corridor makes it ideal for delivering vital disaster recovery and failover services for businesses throughout the Southeast.”


One of the initial customers is Hard Rock International, which chose Savvis’ new Atlanta facility as part of its business continuity and disaster recovery solution for its 60 locations worldwide. “Business continuity and disaster recovery are fundamental IT requirements for our geographically dispersed operations,” said Kelly Maddern, Sr. Director of Information Technology, Hard Rock International. “Savvis’ experience with IT infrastructure, combined with their new Atlanta data center, makes them ideally suited to provide failover capabilities preventing any disruption in operations or service to our customers.”

Savvis now operates 24 data centers in the U.S., Europe, and Asia encompassing approximately 1.1 million square feet. The company is preparing to open additional data centers in Piscataway, N.J., Sterling, Va. and Santa Clara, Calif.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.