Edmunds.com Leases Digital Realty Space

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Automotive information publisher Edmunds.com, Inc. has signed a long-term lease for an advanced data center in a facility owned by Digital Realty Trust (DLR), the companies said this morning. The lease is part of Digital’s Turn-Key Datacenters program, in which the company is building out unfinished space in its buildings in 10 cities to provide “move-in ready” space for enterprise tenants. The location and size of the facility were not announced.

“Digital Realty Trust’s Turn-Key Datacenter space meets our immediate technical needs, and it will accommodate the growth we expect over the years,” said Philip Potloff, Executive Director of Infrastructure Operations at Edmunds. “Digital Realty Trust has made it clear that their goal is to be our long-term data center partner, and they have backed that up by structuring the relationship in a very flexible way that will adapt to our business over time.”


The new space being developed by Digital Realty is designed with additional capacity for electric power, which is a key selling point for prospective tenants.

“Our buildings have tremendous power capacity and we structure our contracts in a flexible, cost-effective way that protects clients like Edmunds.com from those power-related challenges,” said Michael Foust, CEO of Digital Realty Trust. “One of the major datacenter trends affecting corporate customers today is the rising cost and limited availability of power in most datacenter facilities. That is a major reason why corporate customers are attracted to Digital Realty Trust’s Turn-Key Datacenters.”

Edmunds’ four Web sites are: Edmunds.com, an automotive consumer information site launched in 1995; the auto enthusiast site Inside Line; CarSpace, which was launched last year as an automotive social networking Web site; and AutoObserver.com, a new venture providing auto industry commentary and analysis.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.