Hosted Solutions Upgrades Boston Sites

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Hosted Solutions says it has invested $1 million in infrastructure upgrades for a Charlestown, Mass. facility it bought with its acquisition of Boston Datacenters last October. Upgrades include a redesign of the interior layout to promote better cooling, an improved data backup system, and additional UPS power support.

“The Charlestown facility has been a staple of the Boston Internet community for nearly seven years, and we are eager to keep our facility on the leading edge of technology and innovation,” said Gary McAuliffe, Vice President and General Manager of the Boston facility.

Hosted Solutions said it intends to spend another $1.5 million on the facility in upgrades over the next 12 months. Additional projects include a new power infrastructure suite, a redesigned network operations center, an upgraded security system, and the addition of a Storage Area Network (SAN).


“These investments signify the importance we place on the Boston market and underscores our desire to be the premier data center and managed hosting provider in the market,” Rich Lee, the CEO of Hosted Solutions, said in a company press release. “We are glad to be a part of one of the best technology markets in the country.”

Boston Datacenters traces its roots back to the 1994 founding of HarvardNet by Bill Southworth. In 2001 HarvardNet was bought by Allegiance Telecom, which later filed for Chapter 11 protection. Southworth and another HarvardNet alumni, Vin Bono, formed Boston Datacenters Inc. to re-purchase the company’s data center at 500 Rutherford Avenue in Charlestown, Mass. from the Allegiance Telecom Bankruptcy Trust.

The acquisition of Boston Datacenters marks the first foray outside North Carolina for Hosted Solutions, which was previously known as Springboard Managed Hosting and has focused its business in Research Triangle, operating data centers in Charlotte, Raleigh and Cary, N.C.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.