Evergrid gets $10M in VC Funding

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Evergrid, which makes data center management software, said Monday that it has raised $10 million in Series B venture capital funding from Menlo Ventures and Acartha Group LLC. The company’s software uses virtualization to manage large clusters of servers in high-performance computing (HPC) applications, monitoring the grid for errors and restarting any processes that have stalled.

“Evergrid provides the next generation software infrastructure for the global data centers of tomorrow,” said John Jarve, managing partner of Menlo Ventures. “There is no other vertical solution in the market that manages all the aspects of large clustered datacenters. Many companies manage part of the datacenter, but Evergrid solves both the availability and utilization problems that large clustered centers experience as they grow.”


“This substantial investment from Menlo Ventures and Acartha Group validates both our technology and our market direction,” said Dave Anderson, Evergrid’s CEO. “Data centers want to optimally schedule high-priority jobs on pools of commodity servers that can quickly recover from inevitable failures. There are other companies out there that tackle parts of this problem, but our customers tell us nobody else optimizes all the issues that face their users.”

Evergrid’s virtualization software takes a slightly different approach than existing hypervisor software (like VMware and XenSource) which virtualize the operating system. Evergrid’s software runs between the application and the operating system, which the company says can improve upon the performance of a hypervisor.

Evergrid is a spin-off of California Digital, a company that created two of the highest performance supercomputers. Current customers include the University of Oklahoma.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.