Scottrade Opens St. Louis Data Center

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Online brokerage Scottrade has moved into a new 34,000 square foot data center in suburban St. Louis, implementing a major redesign of the firm’s IT infrastructure as part of the migration. An existing building was renovated for use as an advanced data center capable of processing up to 1 million transactions per day, with the conversion taking less than 12 months to complete.

“This is the largest investment in new technology that Scottrade has ever made,” said Rodger Riney, president and CEO of Scottrade. “We have seen remarkable growth in recent years, and this data center will allow our technology and customer base to continue to expand at the rate we expect.”


The project was designed by Cisco’s Advanced Services, the business group within Cisco that helps customers design high-performance networks. Development of the new data center was a joint effort between Scottrade, Cisco, EMC, Dell and Microsoft.

“The new Scottrade Data Center is an advanced deployment that will provide significant productivity benefits to the company and its customers,” said Doug Gourlay, senior director of marketing for Cisco’s Data Center Technology Group. “Powering this mission-critical data center are more than 50 Cisco Catalyst 6500 switches which offer high-density 10-gigabit connectivity with advanced load balancing and security features, in addition to a wide range of other Cisco switching and routing products. This scalable network investment, with the capacity to process more than one million trade executions per day, allows Scottrade to add more features to its trading systems and continue to provide a high level of service to customers worldwide.”

Scottrade.com is the online trading site of Scottrade, where customers can place orders online for just $7 per trade.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.