Digital Realty Expands Dublin Data Centers

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Digital Realty Trust (DLR) has continued to expand in Europe with the purchase of a data center at Unit 9, Blanchardstown Corporate Park in Dublin, Ireland for 36.3 million euros ($46.9 million). The property consists of a 120,000 square foot datacenter facility, which is being managed by Digital Realty Trust, and is currently 90% leased.

Digital Realty also announced that it received approvals and has begun construction on a new 120,000 square foot data center on land it acquired in Dublin in early 2006 in the Clonshaugh Industrial Estate. The company acquired the 2.6 acres when it bought a 20,000 square foot data center, which it then leased to “a major U.S. Internet enterprise.” Digital Realty has also opened offices in London and Dublin to manage its European facilities.


Digital Realty purchased a data center in Paris in December, and acquired a pair of facilities in Amsterdam last summer.

“We now have nearly 1 million square feet in seven properties in Europe, including 120,000 square feet under construction,” said Michael Foust, CEO of Digital Realty Trust. “Our staff of seasoned professionals provide corporate customers with cost effective datacenter solutions utilizing the team’s deep experience leasing, managing and building datacenter facilities throughout Europe. DLR has combined the datacenter best practices that we have developed in the U.S., the U.K., and in Ireland, and we are well-positioned to continue to grow our European portfolio to meet the needs of this important global market.”

Digital Realty Trust, Inc. owns and manages 61 data center or Internet gateway properties in 25 markets, comprising approximately 11.5 million rentable square feet, including 1.5 million square feet of space held for redevelopment.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.