RagingWire Builds Own Power Substation

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Rising power loads for high-density server installations are prompting some industrial-strength infrastructure upgrades. Today Sacramento-based managed hosting specialist RagingWire Enterprise Solutions, Inc. said it has completed construction on a dedicated onsite 69kV power substation. With a total capacity of 46 megawatts, the substation provides plenty of power to support the growth of RagingWire’s expanding high-density hosting operation, including its recently announced Phase 3 data center expansion, which is engineered to reach over 250 watts per square foot.

“Many providers are turning down client requests to bring in additional data circuits because they simply lack the capacity to handle their clients’ increasing workloads and power needs,” said John Hoffman, CEO of RagingWire. “RagingWire has made the necessary investments in our data center facility to support our clients’ current and future power requirements.”


RagingWire’s 10,200-square-foot 69kV onsite substation includes power feeds from separate 230kV main utility substations to support its enterprise clients. RagingWire also installed 12kV voltage regulators within the substation to ensure a steady voltage delivery to its clients’ servers on the data center floor.

“N+1 redundancy and automatic transfer on our 69kV substation provides a level of power and reliability that is uncommon at these levels,” said Joe Kava, vice president of operations at RagingWire. “By tapping a direct 69kV from a local utility, we ensure our clients a reliable source of clean, scalable power and a path for their future growth.”

RagingWire Enterprise Solutions provides managed services and world-class IT solutions including software as a service (SaaS) and high-density hosting.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.