Telehouse Reports Growth in NYC, LA

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Colocation provider Telehouse announced that it has seen “double-digit growth” in both members and traffic at its Internet exchanges in New York and Los Angeles. The number of companies peering at the The New York International Internet Exchange (NYIIX) at 25 Broadway rose from 73 to 92 companies (26 percent) in the period between October 2005 and September 2006, Telehouse said. Membership at the L.A. peering exchange at 626 Wilshire Boulevard grew from 26 to 37 companies (up 42 percent).

Bandwidth upgrades helped fuel growth in peak traffi volume at both exchanges, Telehouse said. The NYIIX’s peak traffic volume went from 10.8Gbps to 19.4Gbps, while LAIIX peak traffic scaled from 1.0Gbps to 3.3Gbps. Telehouse attributed the gains to focused efforts begun in 2004 by the sales, marketing and Internet engineering teams.

“We anticipated the traffic volume trends driven by the media, entertainment, financial, legal, government and health sectors. NYIIX and LAIIX were ready to handle the demand,” said Akio Sugeno, the director of IP engineering at TELEHOUSE America.


Engineering improvements included the addition of a remote switch at New York City’s 111 Eighth Avenue carrier hotel and the creation of a seamless redundant fabric with a 10Gig Ethernet interface between the 25 Broadway, 111 Eighth and 60 Hudson Street carrier hotels. Telehouse also expanded private and VoIP peering services at NYIIX and LAIIX, making available NeuStar’s SIP-IX services to facilitate VoIP peering.

Telehouse America operates NYIIX out of its Broadway Center at 25 Broadway in Manhattan, New York. The company’s Los Angelese Center, at 626 Wilshire Blvd. (“626W”) in downtown Los Angeles, houses LAIIX, whose dark fiber connection to the 1 Wilshire Boulevard carrier hotel offers direct access to all of the carriers there.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.