Telehouse Beefs Up NYC Power Infrastructure

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Telehouse America will expand the power capacity and infrastructure of its Broadway Center colo facility at the 25 Broadway carrier hotel in Manhattan. The upgrades, which will be compelted by December 2006, will make the facility more reliable and increase its power capacity by 20 percent. “As metro New York’s power distribution grows more uncertain yearly, the changes at 25B will insure that clients and NYIIX members will have dependable, secure power availability,” Telehouse said.

Telehouse said it will add four new UPS units to 25 Broadway’s existing UPS setup. In this setup – known as an N+1 configuration – if a UPS unit exhibits a power load distribution failure, the load will transfer to its UPS mate without interruption.

Telehouse said the UPS upgrades were motivated by New York area power outages over the summer. “An extremely hot summer severely tested New York’s power generation and distribution,” said Masahiro Furuya, president and CEO of TELEHOUSE America. “Our clients expect us to be their safeguard in these situations. This upgrade insures that we will meet our clients’ reliability expectations for years to come.”


“Power will continue to dominate client conversations,” said Furuya. “Moreover, new servers, built to meet exploding storage and transfer requirements mandated by regulations, point to higher energy use. We also have greater ‘hardware to space density’ ratios and rising fuel prices connected with providing power and cooling.”

Broadway Center, located at 25 Broadway in downtown Manhattan, is the home of The NYIIX, a neutral Internet exchange (peering) point. The building, which is a critcial communication shub for many financial firms, was among those that struggled with outages and diesel fuel shortages in the wake of the September 11 attacks.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.