Akamai to Speed Delivery of Podcast Ads

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Podcasting ad network Kiptronic will use Akamai’s global content delivery network to accelerate the delivery of its publishers’ audio and video podcasts over the Internet.

Kiptronic enables podcast publishers to select targeted advertisements and sponsorships to run with their podcasts, while providing advertisers with access to targeted, niche audiences through podcasts. Its network features nearly 600 podcasts representing 17 million monthly downloads, with 150 advertisers.

“Content producers demand a network that delivers their programming with the speed and reliability end users require to maintain their interest,” said Jonathan Cobb, founder and chief executive of Kiptronic. “By leveraging Akamai’s established global network, Kiptronic has solved one of the most significant problems facing multimedia publishers – integrating new technologies with existing investments.”


Akamai says its EdgePlatform is the world’s largest distributed computing network, consisting of more than 20,000 servers in 71 countries worldwide. By overlaying the existing Internet with a network of secure, performance-optimized server hardware, Akamai provides a scalable platform to deliver bandwidth-intensive content and applications.

“As podcasting migrates from hobby to new business model, podcasts will become an efficient and cost effective way to monetize existing content and communicate broadly to key audiences,” said Brad Rinklin, vice president of marketing at Akamai. “When advertisers are involved, a reliable podcast download is even more critical. That’s what Akamai ensures. By integrating Kiptronic’s services with Akamai’s global platform, sponsors, podcasters and podcatchers receive the key benefits of a reliable and scalable distribution network.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.