Switch & Data Expands Services to Limelight

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Switch and Data has expanded its colocation and peering agreement with Limelight Networks, a leading content delivery network for digital media. Switch and Data currently provides private and public peering and interconnection services to Limelight from its colocation facilities in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Palo Alto, San Jose, Seattle and Washington, DC. In October 2005, Limelight Networks added 10GigE ports in Switch and Data’s Palo Alto and New York PAIX facilities as part of a build-out of its delivery architecture.

Limelight’s content delivery network delivers on-demand and live Internet distribution video, music and downloads for more than 600 of the world’s top media companies. “Switch and Data will help support our delivery network,” said Gary Baldus, vice president of infrastructure at Limelight Networks. “The capacity requirements our customers are driving require us to work with partners who can provide quality infrastructure we need and who have the ability to help us cost-effectively scale and support our fast growing customer base.”


“Our extensive footprint, with hundreds of available networks for interconnection and peering, enables Limelight to operate at the edge for the efficient and reliable streaming of content for their customers,” said Ernest Sampera, CMO of Switch and Data.

Based in Tampa, Florida, Switch and Data operates a network of neutral Internet exchange and colocation facilities, with 33 data centers in 23 markets serving more than 800 customers.

Limelight’s customers include many of the world’s top media companies, including Akimbo, Belo Interactive, Brightcove, Buy.com, DreamWorks, Facebook, FOXNews.com, IFILM, MSNBC.com, MySpace, Valve Software, and Xbox Live.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.