Miami NAP Provides Colo for Local Governments

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Terremark Worldwide, Inc. (TWW) today announced that the City of Miami Beach and the City of Doral have signed contracts for colocation services at the NAP of the Americas facility. These cities join Miami-Dade County, the City of Coral Gables, and other state and local government entities which housed their critical infrastructure at the NAP of the Americas.

The business continuity and communications capabilities of the NAP could prove critical to south Florida municipalities in the event of a major hurricane. “The NAP provides the perfect environment to deploy the City’s back-up and disaster recovery programs preventing disruption of services to our residents and end-users due to hurricanes and other emergency situations,” said City of Doral Mayor Juan Carlos Bermudez.

The 750,000 square foot NAP of the Americas building is engineered to withstand a category 5 hurricane. Both the City of Miami Beach and the City of Doral will be provided with secure and redundant Internet access, colocation space and power. This collocation space will serve as the foundation for the Cities’ internet and disaster recovery platforms.


The contracts were an outgrowth of Terremark’s existing contract with Miami-Dade County, which allows Florida’s public schools, counties and cities to purchase services under the Miami-Dade Unified Access Program contract vehicle in a cost-effective manner. “The NAP provides us the peace of mind that our data will be secured, accessible and that we have the ability to expand in a cost-effective manner, without taxing our core business or delivery of services to the City residents,” said Jorge M. Gonzalez, Miami Beach City Manager.

The City of Miami Beach is committed to advancing technology and will soon become the first major city to provide free wireless internet service citywide. Miami Beach is 7.2 square miles and is home to over 90,000 residents and hosts over eight million visitors a year.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.