Equinix Opens Fourth Facility in Silicon Valley

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Equinix, Inc. (EQIX) today announced the opening of its fourth Internet Business Exchange center in Silicon Valley. The 120,000 square foot center in Sunnyvale and will add approximately 1,800 cabinets and increase Equinix’s Silicon Valley footprint to more than 500,000 square feet. The center was originally built-out in 2001 at an estimated cost of $80 million and was acquired by Equinix through a long-term lease last June.

The center is interconnected to Equinix’s three other Silicon Valley centers by dark fiber links managed by Equinix, enabling new customers in each center to have direct access to the more than 50 networks already operating in Equinix’s Silicon Valley centers.

“The Silicon Valley continues to be a critical and a fast-growing junction point for enterprises, content providers and network service providers seeking to interconnect their networks and exchange data traffic with each other,” said Peter Van Camp, CEO of Equinix. “This new center provides a smooth growth path for our current customers in Silicon Valley and with this new addition to its IBX centers, Equinix continues to solidify its market leading position in the region.”


Equinix has been seeking to expand its network of mission-critical facilities, and recently announced that it would invest $165 million in a new data center in Chicago, which will supplement Equinix’s existing IBX center in downtown Chicago. Equinix will pay $9.75 million for the site, with closing contingent upon an engineering review and additional site analysis.

Equinix also detailed plans to invest $50 to $55 million to build out one of the undeveloped sites within its 461,681 square foot northern Virginia data center campus. The center will feature an updated design that will enable Equinix to expand its capacity and support the increased power and cooling demands of customers. Equinix intends to open the new center for customers in early 2007.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.