Telehouse Internet Exchanges See Growth

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Internet exchanges operated by colocation pioneer Telehouse in New York and Los Angeles experienced strong growth in the second quarter of 2006. The New York Internet Exchange (NYIIX) and The Los Angeles Internet Exchange (LAIIX) each added members as more companies opted for public and private peering’s economic benefits.

The NYIIX, metro New York’s largest peering exchange, now has ninety-three members as it welcomed Access IT, Choopa, Dream Tank, Freedom Networks, Interserver, Virgin Radio, MTN and Xand Communications. The increase in membership and upgrades for Globix/Neon and Internet Solution (which are at NYIIX’s home base at the 25 Broadway carrier hotel) helped the exchange hit a peak traffic volume just under 16Gbps.

“Paralleling our growth in peak traffic and membership is the expanded media and entertainment peering opportunities NYIIX and LAIIX offer our members and customers at 25 Broadway, 60 Hudson, 111 Eighth, and 626 and One Wilshire,” said Michael Vallone, head of marketing at Telehouse America. Our new members make this space even more attractive.”


On the west coast the membership of LAIIX rose to thirty-six with the arrival of American Internet Service, Interworld, Linkline, Oversee.net, Teleglobe and WV Fiber. LAIIX approaches 2.8Gbps peak traffic volume.

During the second quarter the Telehouse sales team began offering clients NYIIX and LAIIX private, virtual private and VoIP peering services. Telehouse also began building a critical mass of private peering traffic by working closely with tier 1 carriers and proactively continues to do so.

Telehouse America operates NYIIX out of its Broadway Center at 25 Broadway in Manhattan, New York. The company’s Los Angelese Center, at 626 Wilshire Blvd. (“626W”) in downtown Los Angeles, houses LAIIX, whose dark fiber connection to the 1 Wilshire Boulevard carrier hotel offers direct access to all of the carriers there.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.